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, anne-marie slaughter and ian bremer who i will ask to gaze into their crystal balls. will assad fall, will israel bomb iran, and will the euro zone finally break apart? >>> then the fiscal cliff. the view from across the pond. how did our political process look from a perch overseas and what will it all mean for the u.s. economy and the global economy? >>> also, will this be india's awakening? the nation confronts its own dark corners after a despicable deadly act. i'll look at some parallels with america's recent tragic school shooting. >>> first, here's my take. the deal to avoid the fiscal cliff is a small victory for sanity, but what it says about the future is somewhat bleak. washington will probably lurch from crisis to crisis kicking problems forward and placing band aids small solutions on those it does address. there will likely be no large-scale initiative on tax reform, entitlement reform, energy policy, probably even immigration reform and this is the real worry. because beyond the self-inflicted crisis of the cliff and the forthcoming debt ceiling, the united states face
is assad. you thought last year he would have fallen by now. most people did. it looks like a better prediction this year, but it seems as though it's even conceivable that he could wait out 2013 or no? >> no, i don't think so. i would say he hasn't fallen yet, but we're now into the end game where it's clear he's going to fall and just a question of how long, not just we're predicting, we want him out, but he really is on his way out. i don't think there is any way he will survive 2013, but i'm not convinced there will be a government to replace him by the end of 2013. >> why has he stayed there as long? i was more skeptical that he would fall quickly and the reason was simple. a very strong army and they have been incredibly brutal in their willingness to use it against the rebels. >> that's part of it. it's a real state. this is not like -- this is a real state but look what happened to the sunnis in iraq. they took their cue from that. they know it's not going to be pretty aftermath and they had external support. the russians and the chinese diplomatically and the iranians milita
making news now. >>> a show of defiance today from syrian president, bashar al assad. in front of his supporters, the syrian leader gave his first public speech since june and effectively thumbed his nose at the international community, insisting his vision of syria's future will lead the country out of crisis. al assad also refused to work with the opposition, calling them "enemies of god who will go to hell." al assad has lost all legitimacy and he has to step down, the state department says. >>> search is on right now for famed fashion director vittorio missoni. he, his wife and four others were on a plane that disappeared off the coast of venezuela this weekend. he helps lead a fashion empire worth millions of dollars. >>> as you drone attack killed 17 suspected militants in pakistan's tribal region today that strike near the afghan border injured three, according to intelligence sources. it follows two similar attacks last week, one of which killed a taliban commander. >>> 130 trained mountain rescuers are combing a five-mile area east of seattle. they are looking for this man, 2
there was a surprise nationwide address by the dictator bashar al-assad andddres what he had to say was a cause for worry. it was his first speech in six months and assad said he won't step down and he won't negotiate with the rebels. the civil war there has spilled over syria's borders from time to time so now u.s. soldiers have landed in turkey to man patriot missiles on the border. holly williams is ourrder. correspondent in turkey reporting from istanbul tonight. holly, why do the turks wanty, these patriot missile batteries?es >> reporter: well, scott, turkey asked its nato allies-- including the united states-- toes-- provide patriot missiles because of fears that syria might use chemical weapons.e the turkish are nervous firstly because they have openly backedr the rebels in syria's civil war and secondly because they share a 600 mile long border with syria and we've already seen fighting spilling across that border. these six missile batteries are aimed at detering a much bigger inversion, they're capable of intercepting missiles and aircraft and they would be usedd they to defend turk
to the asad -- assad regime, and trying to insist the planes land for inspection. they have just done two inspections, and one plane was empty from damascus. it's a good question, and i think the answer is a complicated one, but i would say two things, in any country that is a newly emerging country, there is a sense of nationalism that you have to contend with which is legitimate. they have air own government and leaders. you can't dictate to them what to do, and there are a lot of states in the region that have their -- trying to meddle in iraq, the iranians big time, turkey, gulf states, trying to exert influence inside iraq, but, also, a big part of the answer is, really, what's happened to the united states? the american government is conflicted on iraq. the obama administration, itself, was ambivalent about whether to keep forces in iraq beyond 2011 or not, and, in fact, president obama campaigned on the ten in a minute that he had extra kateed forces from iraq completely, planned to, the military hoped to keep 5,000 to 15,000 there, including to fight al-qaeda, so, you know, when t
and describe a national reconciliation conference and a new syrian constitution. guest: president assad has adopted a bellicose reaction to the rebellion. it is not an all-out civil war. throughout this conflict, he has adopted this tone that these people are terrorists and criminals. 60,000 syrians have been killed in the civil war. he is going to come middle ground to the rebels who think they are winning at this point. host: cure associated press is pointing out this is his first speech since last june theory his opponents are -- the associated press is pointing out that this is his first speech since last june. guest: the rebels are winning this conflict. the question is how long will it go on and how many syrians have to die before the assad regime toppled or some deal is reached to send him into exile. there is no deal that leaves him sharing any power. host: if he goes into exile, which country will take him? guest: russia has been his biggest backer. it comes immediately to mind as someone who would want to take someone responsible for the death of 60,000. host: during the conflict,
assad in months. tonight we asked alex marquardt to read between the lines. is this a leader who thinks he can survive? >> reporter: president assad mobbed by supporters at his first address to the nation in over half a year. in front of the faces of soldiers who had died, he slammed the west and called for political dialogue to end almost two years of war. regional and western states should stop furnding, arming and sheltering rebels, he said, who should also stop all acts of terrorism. assad said the military would then stop fighting and peace talks could start. we will negotiate with the ones that are behind those puppets, he said. we want a dialogue with the master, not with the servants. the united nations says the civil war has left more than 60,000 syrians dead. in his only interview with american media during this conflict, assad told abc's barbara walters that his forces targeted terrorists, not civilian protesters. >> what is the misconception if there is any, about the protests? >> we don't kill our people. nobody kills -- no government in the world kills its people unless --
and senator john kerry expected to take over. >>> rare speech from syrian president bashar assad has drawn a quick and blunt reaction from the obama administration. a defiant assad rejected international calls to step down and tried to justify his crackdown on anti-government rebels. he outlined plans for a national reconciliation conference and new constitution as well. but the u.s. state department says the syrian leader is "detached from reality." >> spokesperson for the state department released a statement saying, quote, assad has lost legitimacy and must step aside to enable a political solution and democratic transition that meets aspirations of the syrian people. you would think at this point. 60,000 syrians have been killed since this broke out two years ago. how do you negotiate peace with that much blood on the streets? >> exactly. what is fascinating is what he is floating as something that he floated years ago, and -- just, didn't have any teeth. just wasn't credible. i think also, at this point. even the turkish head of state, former ally, is speaking out against assad. he ju
, this round of sanctions? we're going to talk about that. >>> syria's president assad proposing a peace deal to end the blood did i civil war. he is out with a new proposal. why it is being rejected next. [ indistinct conversations ] [ male announcer ] when you wear dentures you may not know it, but your mouth is under attack. food particles infiltrate and bacteria proliferate. ♪ protect your mouth, with fixodent. the adhesive helps create a food seal defense for a clean mouth and kills bacteria for fresh breath. ♪ fixodent, and forget it. your soups are so awesomely delicious my husband and i can't stop eating 'em! what's...that... on your head? can curlers! tomato basil, potato with bacon... we've got a lot of empty cans. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. jenna: welcome back. everybody one. we await the president's announcement today for two new nominees for the secretary of defense and the head of cia there are some brand new developments in the iran nuclear showdown we want to talk to you about. the u.s. is again tighting the economic news noose by releasing ne
for reconciliation from assad is another day of intense fighting a few miles from assad's home base. leland vittert on reaction to assad's message. >> with blood and souls we defend you chanted supporters for his first televised speech in more than six months. we are now in a state of war in every sense of the word, he said speaking live on state tv, appearing in control. he called those fighting against him foreign terrorists. a revolution is normally a movement of the people continued into the revolution of those imported from outside to revolt against the people. despite heavy losses, still rebels fighting the arm dismissed the offer to negotiate. we fight this man bogged down on the rebel front line. the man who calls himself the president, he is the head of a terrorist gang. assad received a number of standing ovations from a crowd of hand picked supporters, especially as he offered to reform all the syrian institution except the presidency. the u.s. state department was equally unimpressed with his offer as they were of the crowd. >> you see them, renting a mob is not that difficult. >> despi
bashar al-assad is vowing to continue his government's fight against rebel groups while ruling out talks with the armed opposition. in his first public address in six months, al-assad called syrian rebels a tool of foreign intervention. >> we are now in a state of war in every sense of the word. we are confronting a vicious, external war. this form of war is more fragmenting and more dangerous than conventional war because it does [indiscernible] it pulls us into carrying out this plan. this war targets syria using a handful of syrians and many foreigners. it is trying to use us to tear down our trees and destroy our foundation. it is with pity this is happening with the help from some our own. >> al-assad said he is open a dialogue but only with those opposition groups tolerated by his regime. his appearance came days after the u.n. reported the death toll from nearly two years of fighting in syria has reached around 60,000. in the rebel-held town of aleppo, syria residents said his fellow citizens don't trust assad. >> any normal citizen listening to his speech heard him say that he as
.s. officials dismissing bashar al-assad's statement as meaning lease to cling to power. what did president bashar al-assad say for the first time in several weeks. >> essentially the president said the same old thing we've been hearing for a longtime. i'm going to stay in power, we are at war and it's time for syrians to fight for their country. he proposed a peace plan which everyone else laughed at because they said it involved bashar al-assad staying in power, and they say it showed that bashar al-assad had lost touch with reality. this is bashar al-assad very much in control. he has a lot of supporters there in the damascus opera house there in the capitol from which he was speaking, a lot of applause there and was speaking live on state television. his detractors will say what what they will, but many people have predicted bashar al-assad's demise over the past 18 or 20 months, they say his days are over. this is a president very much in control of his capitol and much of his country, bill. bill: does that speech change anything on ground, leland. >> reporter: not rile the violence co
. sandy devastated parts of the northeast more than two months ago. >>> syria's president bashar al assad got a standing ovation today moments before he gave a rare public speech. assad said he's standing firm against global calls for him to step down. he laid out his own plan for dealing with syria's civil war. a u.s. state department spokeswoman says assad's plan is detached from reality and assad should resign immediately. >>> pakistani intelligence officials say a suspected u.s. drone strike killed 17 people today. today's attack follows two suspected u.s. drone strikes last week that killed 15 people, including a taliban commander with ties to the pakistani military. demonstrators protested against drone strikes thursday and burned a u.s. flag. >>> well, the man accused in one of the country's worst mass murders goes to court tomorrow. a judge will decide whether there's enough evidence for 25-year-old james holmes to stand trial. he faces more than 150 counts, including first-degree murder and attempted murder in the aurora, colorado, movie theater shooting last july. 12 people were
blaming outside forces including al qaeda for the violence. bashar al assad dismissing any prospect of meeting with the rebel leaders. was anyone at all surprised that president assad ignored the scope and the root causes, if you will, of the uprising there? >> reporter: not entirely. we haven't seen a lot of bashar al assad in recent months. this was a big speech. he presented it in damascus in a crowded auditorium. he spoke for nearly an hour and really at the end of the speech probably isn't going to change much. he called -- we heard familiar refrains. he called the opposition terrorists and accused them of being made up mostly of al qaeda and made little mention of syrians taking arms against his government and countries in the region are funding and arming the opposition and says he won't negotiate until they stop funding them and went on to propose a new political initiative which would include eventually a new government, new constitution, national reconciliation but said that won't happen until the weapons are put down and these quote/unquote terrorists are no longer funded
for the times. >> you think he'll get the nomination? >> he was in favor of bashar al assad. >> do you think it will pass? >> he was not in favor. that's not fair to say. because he was willing to support negotiations just like stalin and mao doesn't mean he was for him. >> "vogue" magazine was for him and his wife. >> "vogue" magazine is not making foreign policy decisions in the u.s. senate. >> thank goodness. do you think he'll pass? >> i think it's premature to decide. we have to have the confirmation hearings. >> we're already finding a lot of the large right-wing pro-israel organizations, they're not going to fight that aggressively. >>> tonight, a clearer picture just how bad the flu season is turning out to be and could get much worse. if you haven't had your flu shot like i haven't, you might want to listen to this. chief medical correspondent dr. sanjay gupta joins me ahead. >>> flu season is hitting early and hitting hard. government health officials say the number of people seeking treatment for flu has spiked over the month. 41 states are now reporting widespread cases. 18 kids
nominees. >>> and bashar al assad said that the enemies of his regime are going to hell. jenna shared her recipe with sharon, who emailed it to emily, who sent it to cindy, who wondered why her soup wasn't quite the same. the recipe's not the recipe... ohhh. [ female announcer ] ...without swanson. the broth cooks trust most when making soup. mmmm! [ female announcer ] the secret is swanson. >>> both his friends and enemies are troubled by president bashar al assad's latest show of defiance. speaking before a crowd of cheering supporters, the embattled leader delivered his first public address in six months, laying out terms for a peace plan that, of course, keeps himself in power. he ruled out any talks of the opposition, calling them enemies of god who will go to hell. those are his words. hala gorani is joining us to tell us about this. this was in damascus, the opera house. very deliberate here. >> it makes him look statesman like, and the carefully picked crowd, of course. kind of laughably, that ended up mobbing him at the end of his one-hour speech, we saw, as broadcast by syrian t
and missiles. and defiant new remarks by al assad are dashing hopes the fighting will end anytime soon. cnn's nick payton walsh is in beirut. >> reporter: france today echoed western condemnation of assad's speech on sunday. saying he was in denial of reality and, quote, not fooling anyone. i think what we can really take away from his very defiant tone in front of loyal crowds in a theater in damascus is really the end of all efforts for a peaceful settlement by u.n. and even by moscow's diplomats. there had been such high hopes that it would result in some sort of nudge towards assad giving a political concession or finding some kind of settlement. the way ahead, many fear, is the escalation of violence as we go into the military end game here. assad clear he's simply not going to give up power. as that violence escalates, of course the concern is for the humanitarian situation. half a million refugees registered in syria's neighbors. fears that will mount by hundreds of thousands if the violence escalates. the larger fear now in the months ahead. bitter chill of winter hitting these peop
is the situation right now in regards to syria's nuclear weapons? does assad have the intention to use those weapons? do you think the visit to the pentagon is to discuss the this topic, this issue? >> the secretary panetta and him have met on a number of occasions. i'm sure the talk of syria will come up. to your question on chemical weapons, without get together deep in intelligence i'm unaware of any information that the syrians are planning to use the chemical weapons. let me be very clear, this government would view that kind of actions a a red line. officials have been clear about that. we will continue to do so. the assad regime and it continues to perpetrate violence against its own people, it is unacceptable and it is time for the assad regime to go. but in the meantime, they have a serious responsibility to maintain security over their chemical weapons and not to use them. >> so you believe that the syrian chemical weapons are in good hands, are safe so far? >> the syrian regime has an obligation to maintain security over the syrian chemical weapons stockpiles. i have not heard of
reports the chemical weapons of the bashar al-assad regime are ready and could be launched within hours if the order is given. live details on that when we continue. i need you. i feel so alone. but you're not alone. i knew you'd come. like i could stay away. you know i can't do this without you. you'll never have to. you're always there for me. shh! i'll get you a rental car. i could also use an umbrella. fall in love with progressive's claims service. times reporting that syria's stock of chemical weapons is loaded and ready for use if president bashar al-assad gives the order to use them on his own people as that war rages. leland vittert watches it live from our middle east bureau. what is the latest now? >> reporter: though the intelligence came out a couple of weeks ago that the syrians had begun mixing the chemical weapons, that was based on satellite intelligence and signals intelligence, meaning communications intercept. that's when the u.s. went into high gear diplomatically and made it clear to the syrians and the r*ugtss that the use of chemical weapons would be crossing a r
to be focused on is assuming assad comes down and, you know, i think there's a stronger likelihood that could happen. how do we secure the sites in what do we do to deal with that situation? and that is a discretion that we are having, not only with the israelis but with other countries in the region to try to look at you know what steps need to be taken in order to make sure that the -- sites are secured and they don't wind up in the wrong hands. i think the greater concern right now is what steps does the international community take to make sure that, you know, when assad comes down, there's a process and a procedure to ensure that we get our hands on securing those sites. that, i think, is the bigger challenge right now. -- [inaudible] what happens in a transition is there a permissive atmosphere or hostile atmosphere? that will tell you a lot. >> want to talk about the czech republic being egger to help with training the rebels in another cup. is that something that is being looked out? >> yeah, actually the czechs have a very capable, we could call it in this country chemical biological
morning news." the white house is dismissing a peace plan outlined by syria's president, bashar assad, that would allow him to remain in power. in a rare public speech, assad outlined his plan which includes a cease-fire, national reconciliation, a new constitution. assad said he would not step down and blamed his country's struggles on the opposition, referring to them as terrorists and puppets of the west. >>> "the san jose mercury news," despite being advised not to go to north korea by the u.s. state department, former new mexico governor bill richardson and google ceo eric schmidt have arrived in that country this morning. the reason for their trip not clear. speculation, though, has been they're seeking the release of korean-american kenneth bay, arrested on unspecified charges. richardson, a former u.n. ambassador, has traveled to north korea several times before. >>> "the wall street journal." french actor gerard depardieu received a hero's welcome as he begins this week as a russian citizen. depardieu expatriated in protest of france's high tax rates on the wealthy and has re
hhe has bee taken by secret police. first, bashar al assad's first speech since june. it was a bizarre moment. they said they're the enemies of the people, the enemies of god. he was swarmed by supporters even as shelling continued during the speech. the syrian leader saying he will not step down. the u.n. said more than 60,000 syrians have been killed in the past two months. zaidoun told us time and time again when we would speak to him over this past year, he wanted the world to know what was happening inside his country. his family said in mid-december, secret police came to his home and arrested him. they believe that zaidoun and his brother are being held in a facility in damascus notorious for torture and abuse. his cousin who lives in the united states has created a facebook page to demand their release in the hopes that someone inside the syrian regime will listen. i spoke with zaidoun's cousin about the ordeal her family is going through. take a look. when was the last time you spoke to him? >> i spoke to him four days before he was detained. we always worked together. he was
in iraq and fighting while we were working hard to get abu assad and hadn't gotten him yet. and brought me in with the national security council and asked me directly, okay, are we going to get him? and my response was with confidence yes, but i couldn't tell him how quickly, but instead of falling back the way that some leaders might do, you know, false pressure or something like this, he was supportive and professional he said well, stay at it. so, very, very impressive to me. president obama was very gracious to me in every engagement that we had. we did the analysis in the fall of 2009 on the strategy, additional forces and there were extraordinary political pressures pushing on them. there were pressures at n.a.t.o. and pressures inside afghanistan. i'm quite sure there were tremendous political pressure inside the united states and as we went through the process i appreciated the chance to be consulted and to be able to provide my unvarnished input each step of the way. >> sean: i'm going to get to obama and your relationship with him a little in the next segment. let me ask you, two
is his world view. >> you think he'll get the nomination? >> he was in favor of bashar al assad. >> he was not in favor. that's not fair to say. >> because he was willing to support negotiations doesn't mean he was for him. >> "vogue" magazine was for him and his wife. >> "vogue" magazine is not making foreign policy decisions in the u.s. senate. >> thank goodness. do you think he'll pass? >> i think it's premature to decide. we have to have the confirmation hearings. >> we're already finding a lot of the large organizations, they're not going to fight that aggressively. >>> tonight, a clearer picture just how bad the flu season is turning out to be and could get much worse. if you haven't had your flu shot, you might want to listen to this. dr. sanjay gupta joins me ahead. we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so m
to see this in the senate and what deval patrick has to do. the other large bore is bashar assad. he gave a speech that was given in syria. he said "i'm not negotiating with terrorists." take that. yeah, sounds familiar. he is -- we keep waiting for him to fall, 60,000 syrians killed in this violence and no sign of -- >> amazing he lasted this long. >> mine is not exactly a new face. joe biden. on new year's day showed he is the one in the white house that can still work with congress. i think this is going to be a big year for biden because if the president is going to get anything accomplished with congress, it's clear he will need biden to work directly with them. i look for biden and wonder if it's going to make or break his prospects. >> they call him the mcconnell whisperer. >> i spent a day with susana martinez, a republican hispanic governor of new mexico when she took office a year ago, she had a deficit and came in, worked with the democratic legislature, balanced the budget. they no longer has a deficit and right now the president is considering signing katie's law which has to
- assad. it was unclear how many of the syrian political prisoners were freed today. opposition groups said there are tens of thousands being held. the middle east struggled today with its worst january storm in 30 years. at least a foot of snow fell in jordan, blocking roads in amman and cutting off remote villages. that followed days of heavy rain in lebanon that touched off severe flooding. the rain, wind and nighttime dips below freezing were especially hard on thousands of syrian refugees living in tent camps and homemade shelters. in china, the ruling communist party resolved a censorship dispute with an influential newspaper. staffers with "southern weekly" in guangzhou said today officials will no longer directly censor content before publication. other controls will stay in place. protests erupted after censors rewrote a new year's editorial that called for political reform. the washington national cathedral will begin performing same-sex marriages. the cathedral announced the decision today as part of an effort to build a more inclusive community. the 106-year-old cathedral i
bashar al assad outlined new ways for the country to move forward, but he made no mention of stepping down as leader. he thanked russia and china for their support and stressed his country would do whatever it needed to defend itself against, quote, outside forces. the last time the syrian president addressed the nation was in june of 2012. this 55-minute event is courtesy of al-jazeera english. [cheers and applause] >> and this is the first time since november that the president has given a public address in his own country. [inaudible] officials from the united nations said there may be as many as 60,000 people have lost their lives during the course of the 21-month conflict. [inaudible conversations] our translator's standing by to bring you -- [applause] the words of bashar bashar al assad live from the syrian capital. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: members of the government, heads and members of people's organizations, ladies and gentlemen, today i would look at your faces and the faces of people of my country with sadness and pain. i look at the eyes of the children
, the white house has rejected a new proposal from syrian dictator bashar al assad. in a rare speech sunday, he offered to draw up a new constitution and to begin a peace process to end the civil war in his country that has now claimed more than 60,000 lives. he refused to step down or even negotiate with rebels. >>> the nation's largest banks are reportedly close to striking a deal over foreclosure abuses. 14 banks, including chase, bank of america, citigroup, and wells fargo, are expected to agree to a $10 billion settlement. that money will be used to reimburse evicted home oowners d help lower the balances of other struggling homeowners. >>> an invasion off the coast of southern california. squid, giant squid are racing towards shore. look at this. not your typical five-pounders. we're not talking calamari. we're talking babies that are 25 pounds or more. so many, in fact, that the two fishermen that you see here, caught 800 of them, in two boats in just two hours. reportedly, feeding on krill coming in with the tide, which makes me feel not one bit better about it. it certainly makes i
of marriage act is heard the following day on march 27th. new violence in syria after president assad's declaration that he will not step down in a public address, he announced only he dictates the end of the civil war, a 21-month conflict costing more than 60,000 lives so far. those are your headlines. back to ashley. ashley: lawn -- lauren green, thank you so much. appreciate it. president obama facing heavy oppositions from republicans about the nomination of secretary of defense, and rich edson at the white house with more on this story. rich? >> well, one of the next of many fights in the u.s. senate, this one for senator chuck hagel, the president's pick to lead the pentagon, ashley, and looking at the case the white house makes is one that he's a decorated combat veteran, bun who is a bipartisan pick as a former republican senator from the state of nebraska, shows, the white house says, dependence in the pick, and advocate for war veterans, and the white house wants to make the point that he would be a solid steward of taxpayer money. >> as a successful businessman, he knows as
guys were our guys are gone, like mubarak. probably, probably assad is also a goner. such a nice plate -- place like tunisia has gone islamic. qatar, one of the greatest dependence of the united states is turning towards the extremists. hamas attack on israel is not out of the blue. it comes out of that strategic, change strategic map. so here we are being reminded once more, the careful what you wish for. we want a democracy. we seem to be getting islamization, and thus to the middle east movement that is not, say, friendly towards the west let alone towards israel. so what do we do until the good guys really become good guys, and to islamists become good liberal democrats? and didn't we at the very harsh harsh question i'm asking, didn't we do better with the mubarak's for the last 40 years? >> let me just responds very quickly which some of us -- summons us back to 2002001, 2002 to try to insert in our foreign aid to egypt, money for economic development in the for human rights, for other reforms that we felt were very necessary because obviously the nature of the mubarak government
an estimate and the president there, president assad, is refusing to negotiate with rebels and so often we say there is no end in sight to the violence. that's a big question mark about all of that. there are few journalists inside syria so we rarely get to see images like this. often when we show you the images we have to say it is amateur video or amateur photography. not in this case. what you're seeing there on your screen is the anguish of a man who just lost eight members of his family in a government airstrike. it was shot by photographer nicole tong. she just returned from syria after spending months documenting the fighting there. nice to have you in studio. >> thanks for having me. jenna: you just got back, you've been back about three weeks now? >> yes. jenna: how do you feel being back having seen what you have? >> i think it's sometimes, it is a very difficult transition to make because it's hard to, you know, detach yourself and forget about, not forget but just to be very far away from a place that spent so many months inside of. jenna: the conversation here has been continuingl
assad had an army of robotic weapon that fall any order because unlike human beings, robots always follow orders. should we go there or think today about drawing a line, of fully autonimous weapons. >> in a way, it's technofedism. they are possible because of the way of the infrastructure that's behind them. that are the pointy edge of the speer, but the decision, the ability to go from a hyper deductive form of gathering to an inductive form of analytics, using patterns, i worry about
, the syrian president bashar al-assad. he proposed a new constitution that he said would include new laws for the parties and local administration. he think russia and china for their support of syria and stressed that his country would defend themselves from outside forces. the last time he addressed the nation was in june 2012. coverage comes to us courtesy of al-jazeera english. >> this is the first time since november that the president has given a public address in his own country. official figures in united nations said as many as 60,000 people have lost their lives during the course of the 21 month conflict. [chanting] our translator is standing by. [applause] [applause] president bashar al-assad, live from the syrian capital. >> ladies and gentlemen, today i look at your faces and the faces of the people of my country with sadness and pain. i look at the eyes of the children of syria. i'd look at the hands of the elderly today, pain and suffering is spread all over syria. safety and security are absent in these streets. many women lost their children, many children became orphans.
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)